Our Mission.

We stand for the proposition that no one with the insight or potential to change the world
should be ignored because of her gender, race, or previous condition of servitude.

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Survivors of human trafficking face an uphill battle rebuilding their lives. Many have limited access to opportunities or career training capable of giving them true independence or economic power. All too often, Survivors’ career prospects are stifled by discrimination and stigma in existing work environments.


We are dedicated to training survivors in one of today’s most lucrative skills: computer programming. During and after training, our students start earning income by working on client projects in a safe, supportive, and nondiscriminatory environment.


By providing opportunities to individuals who have been unfairly denied opportunity, we seek to unlock innovative potential in ways that can improve these individuals’ lives and society as a whole.

“AnnieCannons” means innovation through collaboration, especially collaboration of the under-appreciated. Annie Jump Cannon worked at the Harvard Observatory with a team of women in the early 20th century. Their names are generally unknown. Yet Annie discerned the very categories stars fall into, and other women in her lab discovered how to measure the distance between galaxies, to understand the elemental composition of stars and their lifecycle. One published a thesis that would serve as the core astronomy textbook for years. Most were told they should “go be a housewife.” We’re glad they didn’t.

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What our students are saying...

“I would highly recommend the training because I believe that every single girl in San Francisco and in this world deserves the human right of education…I think that AnnieCannons is going to change their lives, that it is going to be super helpful because you can have the skills and have the support that you need to follow your dreams and to have a better life for yourself and your family.”

“Reason #1 I joined this training is to help my community.”

“Sometimes [this training] gets complicated and sometimes it’s really fun.”

“I want to use the training to find solutions for the things that are happening in my community like homelessness, housing prices, sex trafficking and domestic violence.”

“Thank you for giving me this opportunity and for the love and support that I get. I feel that this is gonna change my life and my community."



Our Inspiration

Dr. Annie Easley was raised by a single mother in the segregated South, but she still earned a Ph.D. in mathematics and joined NASA; her innovations enabled spaceflight through rocket technology and hybrid car batteries.

Hedy Lamarr, remembered for her beauty and films, actually invented “spread spectrum” radio technology – which allowed the US to encrypt military messages during World War II and which formed the basis for modern wireless technology.

Dr. Mae Jemison went to Stanford at 16 and trained as a physician before being recruited to NASA, where she became the first black woman in space. She later founded a successful biotech company and a foundation for underprivileged youth.

Dr. Chien-Shiung Wu was a nuclear physicist whose insights illuminated the behavior of decaying atoms and who, during the Manhattan Project, developed the process for separating uranium isotopes by weight.

Dr. Rosalind Franklin was a chemist and X-ray Crystallographer whose imaging and study of DNA revealed its double-helix structure & phosphate backbone. Though she was fundamental to identifying DNA’s double-helix structure, her name is rarely associated with the Nobel-prize winning discovery.

Dr. Ellen Ochoa is a pilot, astronaut and electrical engineer who holds three patents on optical engineering systems; she’s logged nearly a thousand hours in orbit, where, as a classical flutist, she was the first to experiment with music in space.

Dr. Flossie Wong-Staal helped identify the virus that causes AIDS – and one that causes cancer – as well as cloning and mapping the HIV genome, which paved the way for her invention of the first HIV test.

Annie Jump Cannon first discerned the categories of stars by observing their spectral emissions, enabling women she worked with to discover that those categories reflected the chemical composition and lifecycle of stars – a breakthrough that forged modern astronomy but for which this group of remarkable scientists is rarely credited.

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